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Doodle Doo

£2.40

A Birthday card featuring a rooster or cockerel with text ‘Happy Birthday – Cock A Doodle Doo’

– Blank inside for your own message
– Printed in the UK on premium card stock
– Supplied with a white envelope

In stock

SKU: C0127 Category:

Description

Doodle Doo

Doodle Do is a birthday card featuring a rooster or cockerel with text ‘Happy Birthday – Cock A Doodle Doo’. After all, you are cock of the walk and the world is yours for the taking. In that scenario, what’s a bird to do but cry cock a doodle doo.

Take a look at the Rooster card and you will see we discussed the alternative words to describe this bird, as well as the origin of the phrase.

Cockerels and Roosters

The word cockerel predates the word rooster by many centuries. However, rooster is the word used in the USA as well as in Canada and Australasia. Cockerel is of course the word that is used in the the United Kingdom. There is an interesting story behind why the word rooster became the ‘new’ word to describe the male fowl. And the reason is that the Puritans simply couldn’t stand the association with the male organ that is implicit in the word cockerel. So in the late 1700s the alternative word that was associated with birds that roost became the preferred word.

The Origin Of The Word Roost

The word roost is also interesting. Of course before domestication, fowls would roost in trees. But the word roost originally meant the place that domesticated birds perch. And that was a wooden framework under a roof for fowls to spend the night. In fact, the word roost grew out of the word roof.

but
late Old English hrost “wooden framework of a roof, perch for domestic fowl,” from Proto-Germanic *hro(d)-st- (source also of Old Saxon hrost “framework of a roof, attic,” Middle Dutch, Flemish, Dutch roest “roost,” Old Norse hrot, Gothic hrot “roof,” of unknown origin. Exact relationship and ulterior connections unknown. Extended sense “hen-house” is from 1580s. To rule the roost is recorded from 1769.

 

And here’s the nursery rhyme again – one that dates back to the 1600s:

Cock a doodle do!
What is my dame to do?
Till master’s found his fiddlingstick,
She’ll dance without her shoe.

Cock a doodle do!
My dame has found her shoe,
And master’s found his fiddlingstick,
Sing cock a doodle do!

Cock a doodle do!
My dame will dance with you,
While master fiddles his fiddlingstick,
And knows not what to do.

SKU: C0127

Doodle do said by a cockerel and text 'Happy Birthday - Cock A Doodle Doo'
Doodle Doo
£2.40