Tyger Poster

£25.00£50.00

Tyger poster features an illustration of a tiger ‘red in tooth and claw’ hidden and snarling in the undergrowth. William Blake used the Old English spelling of tiger in his poem The Tyger.

– Our posters are available in various size options – see below
– Printed on thick, museum-quality, archival, durable, matte paper
– Mailed to you rolled in a tube

Clear
SKU: P020 Category:

Description

Tyger poster features an illustration of a tiger ‘red in tooth and claw’ hidden and snarling in the undergrowth. The artist and illustrator William Blake adopted the Old English spelling of tiger in his poem The Tyger. The poem features in his collection ‘Songs of Experience’ published in 1794. And like many of Blake’s works, he illustrated the poem with a tiger seen in profile standing by an overarching tree. So there is no doubt that it is a tiger that he is writing about. Not that there should be any doubt with lines that compare the aspects of the animal with that of a lamb.

The Tyger

Tyger Tyger, burning bright, 
In the forests of the night; 
What immortal hand or eye, 
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?
In what distant deeps or skies. 
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare seize the fire?
And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?
And what the hammer? what the chain, 
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp, 
Dare its deadly terrors clasp! 
When the stars threw down their spears 
And water’d heaven with their tears: 
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?
Tyger Tyger burning bright, 
In the forests of the night: 
What immortal hand or eye,
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

The Tiger In The Tyger Poster

The way I read the poem, Blake is saying that in an all-encompassing God-made world, one has to accept all of it. It will not do to reject the parts one finds hard to take. In recognising that God made the lamb and the tiger, one has to accept the totality of what God is. God is not only the begetter of gentle cuddly lambs, but also of fearful tigers.

Blake Tried For Sedition

Blake was an activist for social equality and an early supporter of the women’s rights in marriage and in society. He lived in London all his life except for three years he spent in Sussex. At age 33 he moved to Felpham, a village near Chichester. It was there that he found a soldier relieving himself in his garden. Blake complained in terms that led to him being charged with making seditious remarks about the King and the army.  He was tried and acquitted in Chichester Assizes, then housed in the building that was formerly Chichester Priory.
The abandoned Priory still stands, as does Blake’s cottage in Felpham.

Additional information

Weight 50 g
Size

30×40 cm, 50×70 cm, 61×91 cm, 70×100 cm

Tyger Poster with an illustration of a tiger snarling in the undergrowth
Tyger Poster
£25.00£50.00