Greeting Cards

This is the general ‘greeting cards’ page where every card we make will be found. It is not the best place to start to find the cards you want. A better choice is to browse the categories above.

That said, If you want to read about how the modern greeting card came to be, read on.


The history of commercial greeting cards in the UK started in 1843 with Sir Henry Cole. Up until the middle of the 19th century, if you wanted a greeting card you made it yourself. That was fine if you only needed a few cards for friends and family, but Sir Henry Cole was busy, and he needed lots of Christmas cards.

He was so busy that he not only helped found the Public Records Office and the postal system, he also managed the Great Exhibition of 1851. And he helped set up what became the Royal College of Art. And he designed a teapot that went into commercial production.

He was also forward looking and open to new ideas. So in 1843 he got a printer to print his Christmas cards. It was a success (of course) and the idea spread, and soon anyone could buy printed cards.

At least, you could if you could afford them. They were expensive because each design had to be hand drawn and printed using the lithographic printing process.

Then along came photography. And the history of commercial greeting-cards in the UK was forever changed. Soon, printers worked out how to add photographic images of anything – whether of an actual photograph or of a piece of art work – to printed cards. What was previously laborious became easy and fast, and the modern greeting card was born. Follow this link to read more about the history of commercial greeting cards in the UK.

Printing took another giant step forward with digital printing. Printers could now scan and lay out pages of cards in the printing machine with this new technology. The comparatively laborious task of setting up the machine with each card design was replaced with a scanner and a computer. And more and more creative designers could get into card production. Follow this link to read more about short run digital printing.


 

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